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Podcasting can be a great way to share your message with others, but for teachers it's also an excellent opportunity to grow in the classroom and share new things with your students. Ryan of the Classroom Brew podcast shares all about his podcasting journey and how he brings his new knowledge into the classroom.

Stacey Ogden:  
Podcasting can be a great way to share your message with others, but for teachers it’s also an excellent opportunity to grow in the classroom and share new things with your students. Today’s guest shares all about his podcasting journey and how he brings his new knowledge into the classroom. Stick around

Welcome to Side Hustle Teachers where we believe that being a teacher doesn’t mean you have to be broke or burned out. Our mission is to help teachers like you build successful businesses so you can find financial freedom, pursuing your passions and discover the many options that exist for you beyond the classroom walls. Well,

Hello, welcome to Side Hustle Teachers. I am Stacey Ogden, your host, and today we have an awesome episode for you guys. Now, before I jump into talking all about today’s episode and our special guest, I want to say a personal thank you for taking the time out of your day to listen to this show. It means so much to me that with with all the things that you have to do, that you spend time listening to Side Hustle Teachers. I really appreciate it and I appreciate you for listening. Now, if this is your first time listening, thank you for tuning in and giving us a shot. If you’re a longtime listener, thank you too because we would not be here without you. Now wherever you’re at on the spectrum of how long you’ve been listening to the show, it would really, really, really help us out here.

If you would go to whatever podcast app you are listening to us on and leave us a rave review. This is what helps iTunes or Apple podcast or Google podcast find us and let people know that we are here and we are helpful and helps more people find us so that we can help more people just like you. So take a quick second, leave a great review for us if you’re feeling so inclined and know that we appreciate you, your time and your interest inSide Hustle Teachers. Today, we are talking with Ryan of the classroom brew podcast. And one of the things that I thought was so interesting about this conversation is that Ryan really took this idea of starting a podcast and talking about teaching in this casual, friendly sort of way over a couple of beers and has now turned it into a way to make money for his family.

So this is one of the things that I love about podcasting, is that you really just never know where it’s going to go. He’s also started to use his knowledge and his new technology and his new equipment to help his students have a better learning experience. So I know you guys are going to get a ton out of this interview. It’s fun, it’s informative, and you’re going to walk away wanting to start a podcast. So without further ado, let’s jump in with Ryan from the classroom brew podcast. Ryan, thanks so much for joining us today. Yeah, thanks for having me on. So before we jump in to everything you’ve got going on right now, why don’t you tell us a little bit about who you are and what [inaudible]

Classroom Brew:             
Sure. Well I’m Ryan has you said, and I’m a teacher on the South side of Chicago, about to enter in year three. I also coached weightlifting and football and I run a podcast and doing a little bit of voiceover work. So just a little bit of everything and yeah, enjoying everything that I do. Yeah. So you got a lot, a lot of little different projects going on. Yeah. It keeps me busy. If not, I’d go insane.

Stacey Ogden:    
Yeah, I know. I feel the same way. So how do you find managing all those things going on?

Classroom Brew:             
Well, I really enjoy Google calendar. That’s been my number one thing. When I started commuting for grad school back when I was in grad school, it kind of told me where I had to be because it was hard to keep track of all that stuff. So now it’s, it’s much easier because I can really just, I have two locations really. There’s work and then there’s home that I can manage to doing coaching and teaching and voiceover stuff and podcasting stuff. So it, it’s become a lot more manageable than in the past. Yeah. So tell us a little bit about your podcast. So, classroom rule, it’s a, it started when, honestly I was sitting around with some buddies and we were having a few beers talking about it was student teaching stories at the time. And I was like, Oh, that’d be a good idea for a podcast, joking, you know, off hand.

And then fast forward like six months later or so midway through my first year and I’m like, Hmm, maybe I should actually think about doing this. And so that’s all it is. It’s teachers sit down. Sometimes I do it over the phone to kind of like you do. And we have a few drinks and then we talk about whatever. Like sometimes it’s current events, if someone wants to talk about it. A lot of times it’s just funny stories or a few topics that we have in mind. It just kinda goes wherever, wherever it takes us. So,

Stacey Ogden:   
And what made you decide like a podcast over the other channels you could use, like blogging or YouTube?

Classroom Brew:             
Well, I did start doing occasional video podcasts, either full episodes or just a little clips from it. I started with just doing audio and I preferred doing audio and that’s what gets the most traffic on the internet because it’s just easier for me. I don’t like doing video editing. It’s kinda nice for people. We don’t really use last names on the podcast for obvious reasons. If there’s like a, you know, a story that maybe they don’t want to get out or something like that, or they don’t want to out a student, anything like that. Not that there’s ever been a problem, but it’s just a little bit easier for their anonymity if they choose to just go by their first name. And honestly, it’s, for me, podcasting, it’s mostly when I’m in the car, when I listened to it. And so even though I don’t really listen to my own, I probably should hold up it, but once I’m done editing it, it’s gone. But I feel like it’s the most successful medium for people. Like they’re either working out or they’re at work doing something. They can’t necessarily commit to the visual in addition to the audio

Stacey Ogden:    
Yeah. I’m a car listener as well, so I totally get that. I know there’s, I’m sure there’s laws against putting YouTube up on your dashboard and watching you’re heading nowhere, right. Unless you’re like, Hey kids, you want to watch this random interview with this old person in the back and then watching them in their van. Yeah. And I’m with you on the editing of videos. It’s, it’s not a fun thing to do, so. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. So how do you find guests for your podcasts?

Classroom Brew:  
Oh, that’s the hardest part.  So for a lot of it, at least in the beginning, it was people that I knew personally. So I had some friends on, I’m sure people were, that’s like the stereotypical or whoever podcasts, you should be on it. And they’re like, God sake, we leave me alone. But I had a few friends that were willing to come on and then it branched out into, like, my buddy said, you should try it, like Facebook groups. And then I would meet people on there and that’s when I started doing it, like out of studio, like remote recording like we’re doing now. And then a few people were in state. So I was like, Oh cool, let’s find a way to meet up or anything like that. And then more recently, I’ve done this for two years now in the podcast I’ve had students on, those are obviously the ones where we don’t drink those episodes. They are the non explicit ones. But I have seniors that are about to graduate on and it becomes like a series. So like it was three weeks last year. This year it was like six weeks of just episodes where I had students ask them about their lives and graduation, their plans for life after. And it was a lot of fun, honestly. So it’s developed from just being friends to people I don’t know, to students to who knows where.

Stacey Ogden:    
That’s very cool. So, you know, I read once that a lot of podcasters don’t make it past the seventh episode. Right. Comedy, you know, your comment about, you know, I have a podcast I should go on. Kind of reminded me of that. So how do you keep coming up with ideas and things to keep it fresh like the student idea. Sounds fabulous.

Classroom Brew:           
Thank you. I dunno how fresh it, no, I’m kidding.  But there’s really, if I’m going throughout the day I’ll always have like a sticky note or something nearby or, or at my desk, whatever it may be. And if something just comes up and I’m like, Hmm, maybe we can find a way to spin this to make it a little funny or to tell somebody else about it if they’re going through it. Cause a lot of people that interact with this show on social media or that send me an email, they’re first year teachers or early in their career or there’s someone that’s thinking about leaving and sometimes they say, you know, that was actually helpful to hear that Hey, you have a student that walks in, walks out without any word, and then gives you the middle finger. Like it’s nice for them to hear someone else’s side. So it just kind of develops from that. And then you run a podcast too. So you know, you like to ask people before they come on like, Hey, what do you want to talk about? What’s important to you? So they kind of bring their own little flavor into it. So, but there’s never a dull moment. Oh no, definitely not as a teacher.

I still remember on the last day of school, we go out and watch the buses drive by and we count how many moons we get and how many middle fingers we get out the windows and just always a pool going about that. And it’s always triple digits, right? Get all middle schoolers. Yeah. Yeah. So when you started your podcast, would you say what was sort of the learning curve for you? I think launching was probably the thing I didn’t know enough about. I think I had gotten my social media for it a few weeks after I had already started. I posted it to like social media, like on my own account, but I didn’t have like an Instagram or Twitter and I refuse to get Twitter for the longest time. And the awareness beforehand was certainly lacking. And then I guess as you go on, like you have to try different things that you look back and this is why I don’t look back.

You’d be like, Oh my God, why did I even think to try that? Like I know some people do sound effects. I’m not too big into sound effects. Maybe that’s something I should incorporate later. I don’t know. I think, cause I listened to a lot of podcasts too, and somebody, I can’t remember who it’s some famous big podcast or was saying, you have to do a bunch of crappy ones before you can finally like be good. And there’s for sure I’m thinking back, there’s for sure at least some of the solo ones that I’ve done ones without a guest where I’m like, yeah, that’s really not that. Not that great. And I dunno, this is kind of a cool, it’ll be interesting if I ever go back and listen to them to kind of see how it’s developed then go from there.

But yeah, learning curve wise, I think the editing’s always been pretty good. I’ve gotten like obviously the first few episodes and again had issue with like volume. Whereas now I can do like noise removal if there’s like background noise and stuff. So it’s much better. And then of course, upgrading microphones, like I went from like a $50 a microphone to, this is like a almost $200 microphone now. So it’s much better. Yeah, it’s funny. What seems like a reasonable expense now at the beginning was like, what are you kidding, $200 for a microphone. Right, right. Well, and I also have, I have a bunch of podcasts, gear at the school cause I’m trying to get things started for a student version and a now. So I have, I have my own three personal microphones here and I have my own, I have two mixers here, but at the school I have two mixers and I have like eight microphones now.

And so it’s really developed into like a thing. So it’s, it is funny how it changes. Like you’re like, Oh God, I don’t want to spend like $50 tops. Then like two later you’re like $1,500 times you use your equipment and like your podcasting knowledge in your classroom to I’ve been trying to more and more, I’ve done a few things where like I had I have a class where they were working on like elevator pitches for like I’m an employee or am a hopeful employee. Here’s the pitch on me. And I offered them extra credit if they wanted to record it. I did a thing with found poetry where they take words from a story and then they create it into something else that has a different meaning. And I offered them like they could read it out loud, just like a poetry read but also have it recorded and then I send them the audio file.

We’re finding interesting ways to use it more and more. I’d love to do an entire unit where it is podcast based. Like maybe they are doing research on their own or listen to another one and creating their own audio and then we can kind of do a learn from each other type of thing. Kind of like project based learning. Yeah. But in audio format, which I’m sure there’s some teachers out there like that’d be great. I can sit and they just listened to headphones and then they’re still learning like I’ll just kick back. So I’m thinking that something like that. But it takes a lot of a lot of prep work. Yeah. But it’s very cool that you can let your, like your, your outside work and it really has a direct impact on your classroom too at the same time. Cause I found that with my multiple side hustles that every time I learned something new for my business, it translates to something I can help my students with too.

Yeah, absolutely. And it sure if for sure it makes the enjoyment that much more rewarding. Like I, yeah, like I’m excited to think about, Oh, I could do something where I’m having students record themselves in a classroom. Like makes it more fun. Yup. Definitely. And Casey bell recently did an episode on her podcast shakeup learning about podcasting in the classroom and how to do it. So it’s in my queue. I have a lot less listened time since the summer and I’m not driving anywhere. I’ll check that one out though. Casey bell. That’s good to know. Yeah. So the other thing you do when you do voiceover work, and I know this is a recent thing for you, so how did you, how did you decide to do that? So it was how, I don’t remember how, I think when I was getting my, my podcast logo, I went to fiber for just like a, a freelance graphic designer that knows way more than I do.

And I saw that you can also become someone that offers gigs and something like that. And I think maybe a year ago I created a page offering voiceover, but I just got like a bunch of spam messages. Like, like I’m the prime minister of India, I need you to send like, you know, stuff like that. And princes and whatnot. Yeah. Whole bunch of them. And they contacted me personally, so they obviously need my help. Right. But so it never really came into anything. But then when I upgraded microphones like six months ago I re posted it, didn’t think anything of it. And then suddenly like, but literally, I’m not sure when episode comes out for you, but maybe three weeks ago I got like two people that were like, Hey, we need this and it’s gonna be regular work. So I was like, Oh, fantastic.

Put it out there. And then they liked it. So nice. What does that entail? I know a lot of people sort of think about it and imagine becoming some famous voiceover artists, but definitely not a, no, it’s, it’s really just a, ah, recorded it in my living room, which is nice. Or I’ll do it here at this table. But you a, I have an app for it, but I also do it on my computer. You just, they basically order it as if you were on Amazon and then you can either accept it or deny it and then upload your work. Once it’s done, they give you certain requirements for it. If they like it, then you’re good. They approve it and then the payment goes through. If you offered them revisions, you have to do those beforehand. It was really a lot easier than I thought it was going to be.

Like I thought like, Oh, I need like a new app for something and I have to have like this software. But it was really [inaudible] simple. That was kind of nice. So what sort of things are you doing? Really do like podcast intros or advertisements? Oh, I don’t know if I have the energy to do like, Hey, welcome to the like, I can’t, I can’t fake that. I think I did so far I’ve done someone’s ad read and obviously I’ve done my own ad reads too. And then the most recent one that I did was, I think it was an [inaudible] introductory like demo voiceover for like some sort of like software for engineers or something like that. Like almost like CAD or something like that. But it was a whole lot of like, if you click on the bar menu, like that kind of stuff.

Like it was very I’m imagining someone that’s frustrated, like there’s like a software error and they’re like, man, I hate this guy’s voice right now cause I keep getting it wrong. Somehow he keeps repeating himself. Like, I know, I know. Click the drop down then. That’s what I’m picturing now. But you could be like the AOL guy, male guy. Yeah. Yeah. Could you imagine? That’d be insane. Or like the woman that does Siri now, like imagine like, Oh wow, that is for her. She probably can’t own an iPhone. That’s probably true. But yeah, it was excellent anywhere. Oh God, no, not yet. At least. No, I have a feeling it’s going to be a very small niche where my voiceover work is actually used. I think that’d be cool if I suddenly heard it places, but I feel like it would also just fade to the background.

Like I might be, let’s just pretend that I did something for like a, like you’re going to hear it out in about, I feel like I’d hear it and be like, Oh, that’s annoying. Oh, that’s me. And then keep walking. It’s going to one of those just zone yourself out. Right, right, exactly. I’m still used to hearing it. You know, we’ve got hundreds of hours of content for the podcast. I’m saying. I’m sure it’s just white noise to me now. That’s true. And you edit your own podcast? I do. For a while there I had a buddy that was helping me out with it. So he was kind of like a producer for awhile. And there was a big video episode that I did with Joe Dombroski, mr D who was on Ellen a couple times and that one went to like a professional studio to kind of help with like the distance.

So we kind of met halfway and they were like, yes. So the video file is going to be like eight gigs and you can handle that. And this is on my old laptop. I was like, how much for you guys to edit this? Like a, so they did all of that, which was nice to take the burden off. And then I didn’t really listen to it until they sent me the file and before I uploaded it. So that was kind of nice to just record it, kind of be part of the star duo there and then enjoy the product after.

Stacey Ogden:    
Yeah, it isn’t. I had an editor myself for awhile and I just, I didn’t, I don’t do enough editing to my podcast to make it worth the expense. Like it’s just very conversational. And if there’s a couple ums and AHS, I don’t really care. So yeah. And I don’t think my audience really cares. So that’s, that’s one of those things that I was like, yeah we can save that money.

Classroom Brew:             
Right, right. Exactly. The only thing that I really do now when I add it is if I have two microphones in the room, I mute the inactive one cause that audio bleeds sounds bad. Yeah. That’s the thing that takes the longest amount of time. Like it’s really kind of rough when you have to, especially if you have, I did an episode where I had three mikes and an episode with four mikes does. That means you’re constantly muting three out of the four, two out of the four and it becomes kind of a kind of a pain. But yeah. Did you edit, sorry? Did you use to edit out ums and stuff like that?

Stacey Ogden:    
No, I don’t think I ever really did cause I wanted it to sound natural and if you have a conversation that just flow, that flows like an Aaron Sorkin script, it just doesn’t sound natural.

Classroom Brew:             
Right? Yeah. I can always pick them up on now I love this podcast. I want to just the guests that I like, but armchair expert and I can always tell they have some really rough cuts in there too. Cause like sometimes I’ll take out like a section, like maybe we shouldn’t have this part in there and I feel like I have a good ear for like getting inflection. Right. So that it seems like there was nothing taken out. Even if it’s like 60 seconds or two minutes, whatever it is. But on that podcast I can almost always tell like, Oh, they took out something right here. Cause it’s like this smart like no pause, just no breath. Like hard cut. But

Stacey Ogden:    
Yeah. Yeah. It’s the same with video editing. You can always tell because the person is like moving like right. Max head run or whatever that guy’s name was. Whoa. Flashback. so were you a tech savvy person before you got started?

Classroom Brew:             
Oh, not really. I mean I was like good with using like Microsoft paint or like Apple preview, but that was about it. I knew nothing about audio. I almost thought that I could get away with two USB mics at one time, but that it doesn’t work that way. You have to get a mixture if you want to do two at once. But no, definitely not beforehand.

Stacey Ogden:   
So how did you go about learning? Did you take a class or was it trial and error or…

Classroom Brew:             
I think it was a mixture of YouTube and trial and error. I feel like that’s my biggest teacher lately is you do get all the YouTube. Yeah. Yeah. Was that your way of, like how did you start to especially cause you use zoom, how did you really start to master that?

Stacey Ogden:   
Yeah, I think it was just trial and error. I had used zoom for meetings before so I was comfortable with that software. And you know, I’ve got pretty low tech equipment. It’s really just my little blue Yeti mic and that’s about it. I have a you know, Logitech webcam but nothing fancy, so, sure. Yeah. I’m, I’m trying to keep things simple cause there are enough complications in life. Yeah, exactly.

Classroom Brew:             
Your show like on the road or is it just in studio for you?

Stacey Ogden:   
Just in studio. I’m so far and I decided to do seasons so nice. So I can have some time to breathe. Yeah. Yeah.

Classroom Brew:             
That might be, you mentioned learning curve earlier. That might be my learning curve. I’ve made the mistake of I go week to week.  Probably should have done seasons, but we’re about a hundred and now so can’t stop at this point.

Stacey Ogden:
I know.  That’s the thing is once you get going and once people expect it, it’s it’s just the way it is. Right, exactly. Although I will say when I, I my first put my first side hustle was a blog and I started out posting five days a week. Oh my God. Which was an insane thing to do,

Classroom Brew:             
Especially if I’m sure you have readers that are like, Hmm, that’s a comma splice right there.  Like the small minute details.

Stacey Ogden:   
Well, that would assume that I had readers when I first year. That’s true. That’s true. Yeah. Other than my family, I’m pretty sure that, that nobody was reading it to begin with. But yeah, five days a week. And then I paired it down and now I’m actually once every other week, so it’d be done. But that took me seven years. Sure.

Classroom Brew:
That’s all, that’s a dedication to blog posting. Okay. That’s impressive.

Stacey Ogden: 
Yeah, it was. It was a little crazy and I had a newborn, it was just not a good,

Classroom Brew:             
I’m sure in the comments like you would get some hate and you’re like, aunt Diane, stop it. Just let me know.  Let me do my blog here. Any alone typos. No.

Stacey Ogden:   
Speaking of, how do you deal with people who know you knowing you have a podcast and you know, that whole situation?

Classroom Brew:             
I think initially I would have been panicked about it. Versus now obviously there’s some seniors that graduated that know about the podcast. I think there’s a few current students that know about it. Like I had one kid that, he was in my AP psych class this year and he like mentioned it. I was like, Oh, that’s kinda cool. Like, how’d you find? He’s like, Oh, so and so told me like, Oh, cool, cool, cool. He’s like, yeah, I’m gonna listen to it to see if you ever, you know, talk talking smack. I’ll do it while I’m reading. And I was like, you don’t do the reading. So he’s like, Oh wait. But yeah, I think it’s fine. I think there might be a few people that I’d be maybe from grad school then I’m like, Hmm, maybe I don’t want you to listen to this episode.

But other than that, I think it’d be cool that somebody actually new about the show or I was actually at an event for a standup and it was in a teacher stand up and I was, I’m away to the bathroom, which was kinda weird, but someone was like, Hey, you’re the guy on the podcast that he shared the thing for. And I was like, Oh, that’s kind of cool. Like I’m like an H list celebrity. I’m like a Kayla’s celebrity, what do you want to call it? But, but yeah. So how long did it take for people to start finding you? That’s a good question. That’s assuming they found it at this 0.2 years in. But I feel like it took at least a few months before it really took off. And that also includes like spreading awareness by going on other podcasts and talking about it and playing the social media game, which I hate.

Yeah I don’t, and I really, I feel like once I feel like it takes off, then there’s like another little like jet propulsion and then we get to another little plateau and I’m like, okay, we’re there. And then another little jump up. Cause I’m hoping that trend continues, but I feel like every few months or so over the past two years it’s kind of jumped into another echelon that does sound like, it’s like that crazy of a jump, but there is some sort of a jolt every few months or so. Yeah. And then you just sort of plateau for awhile. And I mean, well maybe, maybe like a little bit of a dip and then an up and now, but it probably averages out to about a plateau. But it’s hard to tell cause I feel like a lot of, I saw this on a post once where it was like 99% of everything.

Like whether it’s podcasts or whatever, they quit right before they’re about to really make it. I was like, all right, so let’s, let’s just keep grinding. Let’s go for it. But yeah, I’m not sure where it will wind up, but so far it’s been rewarding to see where it’s gone. So, yeah. And now you have a sponsor? Yeah, yeah, we have an affiliate deal which has been pretty cool. It matches our format of drinking, which is, which is a good time. So yeah, I’m not sure how long that lasts for or if it’s, I’ve just been doing it as a read for every episode and put the link in the description, things like that. Cause I’m by no means an expert like at all. So yeah, we’ll just see how that, where that goes. Now, how did you find each other?

Did you reach out to them? Did they find you? So a buddy of mine, the buddy that was helping me out with like producing and a little bit of editing, editing, he, well I was, I was saying, Hey, I want to start reaching out to something that would be on brand. Cause obviously if I decided to reach out to like an architect company, be like, Hey, you want to sponsor me to be like for you dude? But we reached out to a bunch of things and one of them was like, we did breweries and ed companies are kind of hard because they’re looking for like your [inaudible] positivity teacher on Instagram that has like 8,000 thought. Like, you know, the, the tight, not to diss on that, but just there’s a very specific target one. So we reached out to a alcohol delivery service, a few of them, and then drizzly, which is an alcohol delivery service. They reached out back say, Hey, we can offer you this affiliate deal. We were like, cool, let’s, let’s go from there. It’s very on-brand.

Stacey Ogden:    
That’s awesome. So you have a link that I’m not sure when this is going to go live sometime in the fall. But if it’s still actionable, I’ll put it in the show notes for you as well.

Classroom Brew:             
Well thanks. I appreciate that. And it’s easy to cause if you, if you do it as a read. I do like a short link on Bitly. I don’t know if he used those, but those are great. But they could also do like bit dot Lee slash classroom redeliver and then that takes them to their, their $5 off.

Stacey Ogden:    
All right. Yeah. I don’t know many teachers that don’t like alcohol.

Classroom Brew:             
Yeah, that’s what I was thinking. That’s what I was thinking. I thought about putting it into an ad read, but I don’t know like how, you know how stingy they want to be with their, their ad read content. I kept that part out of it and I just had the little just do delivery. Let’s just focus on that.

Stacey Ogden:   
Okay. Yeah. So Ryan, how can people find you if they want to?  To, you know, listen to your podcast or find out more about you?

Classroom Brew:             
So Google is always the easiest. But we are on like Spotify and Apple podcasts. I’m not sure if iTunes is still a thing. I think they’re phasing it out for Apple podcasts now. Yeah. Okay. And then stitchers are pretty big one too. Anywhere they listen they can find it. And then social media, we are at classroom group. That’s for Instagram and Brigadoon. Progressingly Twitter. Yeah. I hate Twitter and I’m not a big, I’m not a big Twitter person. I don’t even think we had that many followers. I don’t really keep up with it. But yeah, those are the places. If they prefer email, it’s just classroom. You’re at gmail.com. We keep it very simple. And then if they want videos, there’s highlights on like Instagram, but there’s also a YouTube channel. Don’t put as much effort into Instagram or into YouTube rather. But that’s where they can get like the full length episodes with video. So that’s where, all right.

Stacey Ogden:
Awesome. Well thank you so much for coming on today.

Classroom Brew:
Yeah, absolutely. Thanks so much for having me. It was fun.

Stacey Ogden:          
Thank you so much for taking the time to listen today. I know that you’re busy and your time is precious, so I truly appreciate you spending some of it with me. If you like what you’re hearing, you can support Side Hustle Teachers in three ways. Leave us a review on iTunes or Apple podcast reviews, help Apple know we’re here and we’re helpful so more people can find us. You can share the show with friends and family. Did you know that podcast listenership is growing every single year? And a lot of that is because of recommendations from people just like you. And lastly, join our community. You can find Side Hustle Teachers on all the major social platforms and we have a very active, engaged Facebook group. Join us. All the cool kids are doing it. In the meantime, I hope you have a wonderful week and until next time.

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